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Handy Checklist for Handling Technology Safely During a Home…

Moving can be a chaotic and stressful time. Especially when it comes to handling your valuable technology. Whether you’re relocating your home or office, it’s essential to take extra care. Both with fragile items and when packing and moving your devices and other tech items.

To help you navigate this process smoothly, we’ve put together a handy checklist. Use this to help ensure your technology remains safe and sound during the move.

Back-Up Everything

Before you start disassembling your technology, make sure to back up all your data. Create copies of important files, documents, photos, and any other irreplaceable information. You can either use an external hard drive, cloud storage, or both. By doing this, you’ll have peace of mind knowing you’ve protected your data. Should something unfortunate happen during the move, your files will be intact.

Organize and Label Cables

We all know the struggle of untangling a mess of cables. This is true especially when you’re eager to set up your devices in the new place. To avoid this headache, take the time to organize and label your cables before packing.

Use cable ties or twist ties to keep them neatly bundled. Attach labels to identify which cable belongs to which device. Trust us; this simple step will save you a lot of time and frustration later on.

Pack Devices Carefully

When packing your devices, opt for their original boxes whenever possible. If you have the storage space, this is why you don’t want to toss those out. The original packaging is designed to provide the best protection during shipping. There are usually specific compartments to secure each component.

If you don’t have the original boxes, use sturdy cardboard boxes. Wrap each device in bubble wrap or anti-static foam to prevent any damage. Fill any empty spaces in the boxes with packing peanuts or crumpled paper to ensure a snug fit.

Remove Ink Cartridges and Batteries

It might seem easier to just load up your printers “as is” to move them. But that’s not a good idea. For printers and devices that use ink, it’s crucial to remove those cartridges. Do this before packing the devices. Ink cartridges can leak or dry out during transit. This can cause a mess or render them useless.

Also, remove batteries from devices such as laptops, cameras, or remote controls. This precaution prevents accidental power-on and potential damage during the move. Pack the cartridges and batteries separately in sealed bags and label them.

Take Photos of Cable Connections

Before unplugging cables from your devices, snap a quick photo of the connections. This visual reference will be very helpful when it’s time to set up everything at your new location. You won’t have to worry about remembering which cable goes where. And won’t need to spend hours trying to figure it out. Simply refer to the photos, and you’ll be back up and running in no time!

Pack Your Wi-Fi Equipment Separately

Reconnecting to the internet is usually one of the first things done for both home and office moves. To make it easier, pack all your Wi-Fi network equipment separately from other items.

This includes your modem, router, ethernet cables, and other network connectors. Clearly label the box “Wi-Fi Equipment” so you’ll know right where to go first to get online.

Secure Fragile Screens

Are you moving devices with delicate screens, such as TVs or monitors? Then take extra precautions to protect them from scratches and cracks.

Place a soft cloth or microfiber cloth over the screen. Secure it with elastic bands or tape. This barrier will shield the screen from any accidental contact during transit. Additionally, make sure to pack these items in a vertical position to reduce the risk of damage.

Inform the Movers about Fragile Items

When enlisting professional movers, be sure to be clear about your technology. Inform them about the fragile nature of your devices and other tech items. Clearly label the boxes containing your valuable devices as “fragile.” Provide any necessary instructions to handle them with care. By communicating your concerns upfront, you reduce the chances of accidents while moving.

Test Everything After the Move

If you’ve moved offices, you don’t want to find out about problems on a busy Monday morning. Once you’ve moved your technology and reconnected cables, turn your devices on. Test them to ensure they work as usual and weren’t damaged.

Something may not look damaged on the outside. But that doesn’t mean that there isn’t internal damage. You want to know this upfront so you can file a claim and call in an IT service professional to help.

Need Help with a Safe Technology Move?

Moving can be a hectic and challenging process, especially when moving office tech. But with the right approach, you can ensure the safety of your devices from point A to point B.

Need help from the pros to move your technology securely? Give us a call today to schedule a chat.


Featured Image Credit

This Article has been Republished with Permission from The Technology Press.

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Do You Still Believe in These Common Tech Myths?

In today’s digital age, technology plays a significant role in our lives. But along with the rapid advancements and innovations, several myths have persisted.

Is it okay to leave your smartphone charging overnight? Do Macs get viruses? And what about those 5G towers? What’s going on with those?

Common tech myths can often lead to misunderstandings. They can even hinder your ability to fully use various tools and devices. In this blog post, we will debunk some of the most common tech myths that continue to circulate. We’ll also explore the truth behind them.

Myth 1: Leaving your device plugged in overnight damages the battery.

First is one of the most persistent tech myths. Leaving your device plugged in overnight will harm the battery life. But this myth is largely outdated.

Modern smartphones, laptops, and other devices have advanced battery management systems. These systems prevent overcharging.

Once your device reaches its maximum charge capacity, it automatically stops charging. This is true even if it remains connected to the power source. In fact, it is often recommended to keep your device plugged in overnight to ensure a full charge by morning.

So, feel free to charge your gadgets overnight without worrying about battery damage.

Myth 2: Incognito mode ensures complete anonymity.

Many users believe that using incognito mode in web browsers guarantees complete anonymity. They feel completely secure while surfing the internet using this mode. But this is not entirely accurate. While incognito mode does provide some privacy benefits, they’re limited.

For example, it mainly prevents your device from saving the following items:

  • Browsing history
  • Cookies
  • Temporary files

However, it does not hide your activities from your internet service provider (ISP). Nor from the websites you visit. ISPs and websites can still track your IP address. They can also still watch your online behavior and collect data.

Do you truly want to remain anonymous online? Then consider using a virtual private network (VPN). Or other specialized tools that provide enhanced privacy protection.

Myth 3: Macs are immune to viruses.

Another prevalent myth is that Mac computers are impervious to viruses and malware. It is true that Macs have historically been less prone to such threats compared to Windows PCs. This does not make them immune.

Some people that tout this myth point to malware statistics. For example, in 2022, 54% of all malware infections happened in Windows systems. Just 6.2% of them happened in macOS.

But you also need to factor in operating system (OS) market share. As of January 2023, Windows had about 74% of the desktop OS share. Mac’s OS had just 15%.

When you consider this, it turns out the systems aren’t that different when it comes to virus and malware risk. The infection rate per user on Macs is 0.075. This is slightly higher than on Windows, at 0.074. So, both systems have a pretty even risk of infection. This is the case even though Macs have a significantly lower infection count.

As the popularity of Macs has grown, so has the interest of hackers in targeting these devices. Malicious software specifically designed for Macs does exist. Users should take proper precautions, no matter the operating system in use.

You need to install reliable antivirus software. As well as keeping the operating system and applications up to date. Exercise caution when downloading files or clicking on suspicious links. Being aware of potential security risks and practicing safe browsing habits is crucial. This is true for Mac users, just as it is for any other platform.

Myth 4: More megapixels mean better image quality.

When it comes to smartphone cameras, savvy marketing sometimes leads to myths. Many people believe that more megapixels equal better image quality. This is a common misconception.

Megapixels are an essential factor in determining the resolution of an image. But they are not the sole indicator of image quality. Other factors play a significant role. Such as:

  • The size of individual pixels
  • Lens quality
  • Image processing algorithms
  • Low-light performance

A camera with a higher megapixel count may produce larger images. But it does not guarantee superior clarity, color accuracy, or dynamic range.

Manufacturers often strike a balance between pixel count and other image processing technologies. They do this to achieve optimal results. When choosing a smartphone or any camera, consider the complete camera system. Don’t only focus on the megapixel count.

Separate Fact from Fiction

In a world where technology is an integral part of our lives, you must separate fact from fiction. Debunking common tech myths can empower you to make informed decisions. It can also maximize the potential of your digital experiences. An understanding of the truth behind these myths helps you use technology more effectively. It can also help you better protect your privacy.

Get the Technology Facts from a Trusted Pro

Whether you need help with an infected PC or setting up a corporate network, we’re here for you. We cut through the tech myths to bring you reliable and efficient service.

Give us a call today to chat about your technology goals and challenges.


Featured Image Credit

This Article has been Republished with Permission from The Technology Press.

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8 Tech Checks to Make Before You Travel

Our technology inevitably comes with us when we travel. Most of us won’t even travel to the end of the block without our smartphones. When you go on a trip, not having your technology there when you need it can ruin your day.

Travel smarter and more securely by doing several checks before you go. Use our handy tech travel checklist. It can save you from suffering from lost devices, missing chargers, or a data breach.

1. Check Your Apps

Have you ever sat at an airport gate wondering why it looked so empty? You then found out that your gate had changed, and you had no idea. You go rushing to the other end of the concourse, hoping you’re not too late.

How did everyone else know about the gate change? They most likely had the app for the airline and received a notification.

Before you leave for a trip, make sure to download any apps you may need. It’s better to download them when you’re at home on your own Wi-Fi. If you wait until you’re at the airport, reception may be an issue.

Some of the apps you may want to grab or update before your trip are:

  • Airline app
  • Train app
  • Hotel app
  • Theme park app
  • Camping ground app
  • Weather app
  • City tourism app

2. Check Your Cords & Adapters

People leave behind countless chargers and adapters every day. They litter airports, restaurants, and train stations around the world. Make sure to bring a backup charger for your laptop, tablet, or phone. Otherwise, you may find yourself paying a premium for a new charger in a gift shop. Your device could also go black if you lose its charger and can’t quickly get a new one.

3. Check Your Power

A great way to ensure you have the power you need is to buy a small charging battery. You can find these in most major retailers or online. They are small “blocks” that hold a charge and can power up a cell phone in a pinch.

Having this extra backup also helps you avoid potential juice-jacking ports. These are fake or compromised public USB charging ports. Hackers use them to steal your data when you plug in.

4. Check Your Mobile Plan

If you’re traveling out of the country, you’ll want to check your mobile plan. If you don’t have the ability to call internationally, then you may not be able to text or call home.

Carriers can add an international capability to your plan, but ask about pricing. It can get expensive if you’re on long calls or using mobile data. An alternative is to set up a VoIP app you can use with your office, friends, or family while you’re traveling. These enable both calls and SMS, but you do need an internet connection.

5. Check or Add a VPN

Free Wi-Fi may be a welcome site when you’re on the road, but it can also be dangerous. You don’t know who else is using that Wi-Fi. A hacker hanging out on the connection can easily steal your data if you’re not protected.

It’s better to use either your mobile carrier connection or a virtual private network (VPN) app. VPN plans are inexpensive and will keep your data encrypted, even if you’re on public Wi-Fi.

6. Check Your Backup

Unfortunately, mishaps occur when traveling. You may leave your phone behind on a boat, have your luggage lost, or get your device stolen while in a crowded area.

10% of all laptop thefts happen in airports.

Don’t lose all your data with the device! Back up your devices to the cloud or local storage before you travel. This ensures that you won’t lose the valuable information on your device. You also won’t need to think twice about enacting a remote “wipe my device” command if necessary.

7. Check Your Device Security

Make your devices as secure as possible before you hit the road. When we’re traveling, our minds are occupied by other things. So, you may not think to check your antivirus or avoid suspicious phishing links.

Protect your devices before you go using:

  • Antivirus/anti-malware
  • DNS filtering
  • Screen lock with passcode
  • Sharing features turned off
  • VPN application
  • Find-My-Device feature turned on

8. Check Your Double-Checks

What do we mean by checking your double-checks? Use the buddy system as a backup. When the family is getting off a plane, each should check with the other that they have all their devices.

If you’re traveling alone, have a friend or family member check up by text. Did you grab your charger? Is your VPN turned on?

Those little reminders can go a long way toward avoiding digital travel nightmares.

Improve the Security of Your Devices Now

Don’t leave your devices unprotected. This could mean a breach of your banking app or personal data. Contact us for device security solutions to reduce your risk.


Featured Image Credit

This Article has been Republished with Permission from The Technology Press.